Home > National > Celebrating the life of President Reagan, Feb 6th a Centennial, Forever an Inspiration

Celebrating the life of President Reagan, Feb 6th a Centennial, Forever an Inspiration

February 4, 2011

Celebrating the life and works of President Ronald Reagan, 100 years: Reagan was, is, and shall always be one of our greatest inspirations. A humble man who yet led one of the greatest modern movements and re-ignited the brush fires of freedom. With a staunch belief in American exceptionalism and the American idea, he treasured our founding values, worked tirelessly to restore Federalist principles, provided a model example of leadership, and was a stalwart in defense of America as a “shining city upon the hill”, for generations yet to come. His memory shall be forever enshrined in our hearts as the greatest 20th century President, and with that being said, we present to you – the following tribute:

Ronald Reagan Centennial: 1980 GOP Acceptance Speech

Thu, 03 Feb 2011 00:14:30 GMT7:02 PM EST

Then-governor accepts GOP nomination

Ronald Reagan Centennial: Presidential Campaign Announcement Flashback 1979: Reagan announces WH bid

Michael Reagan: My Dad’s Principles Can Restore US Greatness
Feb. 2, 2011 — President Ronald Reagan was the model for the tea party, says his eldest son, Michael Reagan, author of a new book about the Reagan revolution. Michael Reagan spoke to Newsmax in the lead-up to what would have been his father’s 100th birthday on Feb. 6.  http://www.newsmax.com/video

Remembering the Presidency of Ronald Reagan Michael Reagan on ‘America Live’  

Ronald Reagan: The One Man Tea Party

February 1, 2011 by Ruth S. King

February 6th, 2011 marks the Centennial of the birth of Ronald Reagan, America’s 40th president (January 20, 1981-January 20 1989).  

 
On July 2, 2009 President Obama signed the act which set up a commission to celebrate the 100th anniversary. In the presence of Nancy Reagan, President Obama stated:
 
“President Reagan had the ability to communicate directly and movingly to the American people, to understand both the hardships they felt in their lives and the hopes that they had for their country. President Reagan helped as much as any president to restore a sense of optimism in our country, a spirit that transcended politics, that transcended even the most heated arguments of the day.”
 
And, those “most heated arguments” of those days, very closely resemble the “most heated arguments” of today that have energized and inspired the Tea Party in its challenge to the present state of America.
 
Ronald Reagan debunked what was then a default assumption that America was in retreat, suffering “malaise”, essentially bigoted and greedy and in need of fundamental reform. He recruited the advice and participation of prominent anti-Communist neoconservatives, former liberals who had been coopted by the radical ideology and “blame America first” of the New Left which minimized the threat of Communism and the Soviet Union.
 
But, he was a conservative long before. He was an anti-Communist union leader in the 1940s; a free market conservative in the 50s; among the harshest critics of Johnson’s “Great Society” socialist programs in the 60s; he was a strong advocate of a bill introduced in Congress in 1947 by Rep. William G. Stratton, a Republican from Illinois, to permit 400,000 displaced refugees of World War II to enter the United States.
 
There will be a torrent of retrospectives about Ronald Reagan, but now as then his own his own words speak best.
 
In a speech in 1952, at a commencement address at Williams Woods College he said this about immigration:
 
“I, in my own mind, have always thought of America as a place in the divine scheme of things that was set aside as a promised land. It was set here and the price of admission was very simple: the means of selection was very simple as to how this land should be populated. Any place in the world and any person from those places; any person with the courage, with the desire to tear up their roots, to strive for freedom, to attempt and dare to live in a strange and foreign place, to travel halfway across the world was welcome here.”
 
In a speech promoting the candidacy of Barry Goldwater in 1964:
 
“It’s time we asked ourselves if we still know the freedoms intended for us by the Founding Fathers. James Madison said, “We base all our experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government.”
 
“This idea that government was beholden to the people, that it had no other source of power is still the newest, most unique idea in all the long history of man’s relation to man. This is the issue of this election: Whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American Revolution and confess that little intellectual elite in a far-distant capital can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves.”
 
The Founding Fathers knew a government can’t control the economy without controlling people. And they knew when a government sets out to do that, it must use force and coercion to achieve its purpose. So we have come to a time for choosing.
 
We need true tax reform that will at least make a start toward restoring for our children the American Dream that wealth is denied to no one, that each individual has the right to fly as high as his strength and ability will take him…. But we cannot have such reform while our tax policy is engineered by people who view the tax as a means of achieving changes in our social structure….
 
You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we will sentence them to take the first step into a thousand years of darkness. If we fail, at least let our children and our children’s children say of us we justified our brief moment here. We did all that could be done.”
 
That’s Tea Party talk.
 
In a monumental speech in 1976 as a challenger to then President Ford named “To Restore America” Ronald Reagan wrote:
 
“Inflation is the cause of recession and unemployment. And we’re not going to have real prosperity or recovery until we stop fighting the symptoms and start fighting the disease. There’s only one cause for inflation— government spending more than government takes in. The cure is a balanced budget. Ah, but they tell us, 80 percent of the budget is uncontrollable. It’s fixed by laws passed by Congress. Well, laws passed by Congress can be repealed by Congress. And, if Congress is unwilling to do this, then isn’t it time we elect a Congress that will?”
 
“Before leaving this subject of our economic problems, let’s talk about unemployment. Ending inflation is the only long range and lasting answer to the problem of unemployment. The Washington Establishment is not the answer. It’s the problem. Its tax policies, its harassing regulation, its confiscation of investment capital to pay for its deficits keeps business and industry from expanding to meet your needs and to provide the jobs we all need.”
 
That’s Tea Party talk.
 
 
On national security he said this:
 
“Our nation is in danger, and the danger grows greater with each passing day. Like an echo from the past, the voice of Winston Churchill’s grandson was heard recently in Britain’s House of Commons warning that the spread of totalitarianism threatens the world once again and the democracies are ‘wandering without aim.’
 
‘Wandering without aim’ describes the United States’ foreign policy. …..Now, we are told Washington is dropping the word “détente,” but keeping the policy. But whatever it’s called, the policy is what’s at fault. What is our policy? Mr. Ford’s new Ambassador to the United Nations attacks our longtime ally, Israel. In Asia, our new relationship with mainland China can have practical benefits for both sides. But that doesn’t mean it should include yielding to demands by them, as the administration has, to reduce our military presence on Taiwan where we have a longtime friend and ally, the Republic of China.”
 
And on Kissinger and détente and the Soviet Union:
 
“Now we must ask if someone is giving away our own freedom. Dr. Kissinger is quoted as saying that he thinks of the United States as Athens and the Soviet Union as Sparta. “The day of the U.S. is past and today is the day of the Soviet Union.”
 
And he added,
 
“. . . My job as Secretary of State is to negotiate the most acceptable second-best position available.” Well, I believe in the peace of which Mr. Ford spoke—as much as any man. But peace does not come from weakness or from retreat. It comes from the restoration of American military superiority.”
 
As President in his first term he acted upon the foregoing principles.
 
In August 1981, PATCO, the air traffic controllers’ union declared a strike. At the time, the unemployment rate was up to 7.4%, as the economy was moving into recession. President Reagan reacted by firing most of the striking controllers and hired permanent replacements. “Union busting” was an absolute taboo in American, nonetheless, when he ran for re-election it was never brought up by the Democrats.
 
It would be unwise to write a hagiography. The Reagan administrations were not without serious flaws.
 
On October 23, 1983, a day that Ronald Regan subsequently called the saddest day of his life, a five ton truck laden with the equivalent of 12,000 pounds of TNT crashed into the American Marine’s building in Beirut. The devastation, at the time the largest non nuclear explosion since World War II, killed 241 persons, among them 220 Marines. Ronald Reagan who had earlier pledged a firm response to terror conducted an unseemly retreat from Lebanon.
On June 7, 1981, 16 U.S.-made Israeli warplanes bombed and destroyed Iraq’s Osirak nuclear facility near Baghdad, more than 600 miles from Israel’s borders.
 
Israel was universally condemned. The White House advised Congress that a “substantial” violation of the Arms Export Control Act prohibition against the use of U.S. weapons except in self-defense “may have occurred” in Israel’s bombing of Iraq’s nuclear facility.
 
Although  President Ronald Reagan said: “Israel might have sincerely believed it was a defensive move. It is difficult for me to envision Israel as being a threat to its neighbors.”Nonetheless, the United States joined the “blame Israel first” crowd at the United Nations in a resolution which “strongly condemned” Israel.
 
His advocacy of “Star Wars” missile defense was ridiculed by many in this country, but it was heard clearly in Russia. While he is widely and credibly given credit for bringing an end to the Cold War, he was dazzled by Gorbachev and in December 1987 signed a treaty with Russia eliminating the entire class of intermediate-range missiles. This led to disillusion and resignation of some top defense officials such as Frank Gaffney and Richard Perle.
 
These are not minor cavils but rather a reminder that all Presidents, even great ones, stumble. As Ronald Reagan said:
 
“If you agree with me eighty percent of the time then you are an ally, not a 20 percent traitor.”
 
 
However, as we begin to observe the lineup of pretenders to his legacy who will vie to run against President Obama in 2012, we see footprints too large for most of them. Someone will emerge.
 
Whoever it is should read closing of his majestic 1976 speech: Restore America Ronald Reagan said the following:
 
“Recently on one of my campaign trips I was doing a question-and-answer session, and suddenly I received a question from a little girl. I’d heard the question before but somehow in her asking it, she threw me a little bit. She said, why do you want to be president? Well, I tried to tell her about giving government back to the people; I tried to tell her about turning authority back to the states and local communities, and so forth; winding down the bureaucracy. [It] might have been an answer for adults, but I knew that it wasn’t what that little girl wanted, and I left very frustrated. It was on the way to the next stop that I turned to Nancy and I said I wish I had it to do over again because I—I’d like to answer her question.
 
Well, maybe I can answer it now. I would like to go to Washington. I would like to be president, because I would like to see this country become once again a country where a little six-year old girl can grow up knowing the same freedom that I knew when I was six years old, growing up in America. If this is the America you want for yourself and your children; if you want to restore government not only of and for but by the people; to see the American spirit unleashed once again; to make this land a shining, golden hope God intended it to be, I’d like to hear from you. Write, or send a wire. I’d be proud to hear your thoughts and your ideas.”
 
The Tea Party has heard and answered the call.
 
God bless the memory of Ronald Reagan – a true American patriot. 
 
 
How to reboot today’s economy with tax reform, monetary policy, and smart government investment
 
 

Everybody Loves Reagan

Ryan L. Cole | 1.31.11 @ 6:06AM

On the eve of his 100th birthday, liberals don’t just revise the 40th president’s record — they practically claim him as one of their own.    (Notice that’s Liberals, not Leftists!)

What Reagan Meant to America – Bruce Walker

Reagan2020.comFederalism and the New Conservatives

Clear Vision for the 21st Century

“We, the members of the New Republican Party, believe that the preservation and enhancement of the values that strengthen and protect individual freedom, family life, communities and neighborhoods and the liberty of our beloved nation should be at the heart of any legislative or political program presented to the American people.” —Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911 – 2004)

Ronald Reagan

Reagan 2020 is the Internet’s most comprehensive resource on Ronald Reagan. It represents a permanent campaign advocating individual, family and community rights and responsibilities in acts of self-governance, as set forth by our Founders in the Declaration of Independence and codified in its subordinate guidance, our Republic’s Constitution, the original intent of which is specified in the Federalist Papers.

Ronald Reagan’s tenure as President, and his enduring legacy, was and remains dedicated to the plurality of Americans who uphold the most basic tenets of our Republic, “… that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

We American Patriots, as guardians of our Republic’s liberty and custodians of Ronald Reagan’s legacy, represent President Reagan’s “New Republican Party.” In addition our mission of providing an exposition of his leadership of, and contributions to, the 20th century’s conservative revolution, President Reagan’s vision for constitutional government is outlined on this site in the New Federalist Platform — the quintessential conservative platform — a template for citizens, for candidates from all levels of government and a touchstone for American conservatism in perpetuity.

Reagan2020.US is Sponsored by: (for more such as bio, speeches, federalist platform, tributes, and more please visit:)

Sponsored by The Patriot Post

“The vision and legacy of the Reagan Revolution flourish on the pages of The Patriot Post.” —Michael Reagan

Read: Alexander’s Essay – February 3, 2011 – The Reagan Centennial

“No man can well doubt the propriety of placing a president of the United States under the most solemn obligations to preserve, protect, and defend the constitution.” –Joseph Story

 Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with DestinyRendezvous with Destiny
by Newt and Callista Gingrich

This Sunday, February 6th, Americans across the country will celebrate the 100th birthday of President Ronald Reagan.

In celebration of this historic event, we are delighted to share with you our new book, Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny. This book, inspired by our documentary film, is a unique photographic collection, honoring the life and legacy of our nation’s 40th President.

President Ronald Reagan believed in America and the American people. While in office, President Reagan created unprecedented economic growth, revived the American spirit and ended the Cold War. Through principled leadership and personal conviction, President Reagan led our nation from a time of despair to a time of hope. The example of his leadership still guides us today. 

The Citizen Politician Although Ronald Reagan is one of the most iconic political figures in American history, he was not a career politician.

Reagan spent the first half of his life pursuing his dreams as many Americans do.

Before becoming President, Ronald Reagan was a student, athlete, lifeguard, radio host, actor and Army Lieutenant. He was also President of the Screen Actors Guild, Spokesman for General Electric, and Governor of California.

Through it all, Reagan never failed to display the hard work and determination that define the American dream.

Reagan was launched onto the national political stage in 1964 after giving a televised address on behalf of Republican candidate, Barry Goldwater. It became known as “The Speech.”

Concerned about the economic and international threats to our prosperity, Ronald Reagan, a former FDR Democrat, reminded us that America’s choice was not between Left and Right, but between freedom and totalitarianism.

Following this historic speech, Ronald Reagan was encouraged to run for Governor of California, despite his belief that, “I’m an actor, not a politician.” In 1966, he defeated incumbent Governor Pat Brown by nearly one million votes.

Reagan was, in fact, a “citizen politician,” who only decided to run for office when he felt it was his duty as a citizen to stop government from getting too big.

Reagan’s bid for the Republican nomination for president in 1976 resulted in a narrow loss to incumbent President Gerald Ford. But rather than focus on his loss that evening, Ronald Reagan gave an impromptu concession speech centered on the American people. His remarks were so inspiring, many in the audience wondered if they had nominated the right candidate:

This is our challenge; and this is why here in this hall tonight, better than we have ever done before, we have got to quit talking to each other and about each other and go out and communicate to the world that we may be fewer in numbers than we have ever been, but we carry the message they are waiting for. We must go forth from here united, determined that what a great general said a few years ago is true: There is no substitute for victory, Mr. President.

Finally in 1980, when he was nearly seventy years old, Ronald Reagan made one last run for the presidency. At a time when Americans were being told they suffered from a “crisis of confidence,” Ronald Reagan shared a vision of optimism and opportunity for America, reminding us of our rendezvous with destiny – our responsibility to confront the challenges of our time and ensure that freedom prevails. In 1981, Ronald Reagan, was sworn in as President of the United States.

The Reagan Legacy

In his first term as president, Ronald Reagan signed into law the largest tax cut in American history. His tax cuts, combined with deregulation, created seven years of unprecedented economic growth.

Upon being elected to his second term, President Reagan turned in earnest to defeating the Soviet Union and winning the Cold War. In his speech at the Brandenburg Gate in June of 1987, despite every attempt by his advisors to eliminate the phrase, President Reagan courageously declared, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” Two years later, the Berlin Wall came down, liberating millions throughout central and eastern Europe.

But Ronald Reagan’s greatest legacy encompasses so much more than his economic and diplomatic accomplishments. His vision for peace and prosperity came true not only because he believed it was possible, but because he helped America believe it was possible.

Through our book, Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny, we hope you find renewed inspiration from a remarkable man, who profoundly changed our nation and the world.

February Charity of the Month: The American Heart Association

February is “American Heart Month.” As we celebrate Ronald Reagan’s centennial birthday and his legacy of giving back to the American people, American Heart Month provides an opportunity for us to also give back to our communities.

AHA’s Go Red for Women campaign and new healthy behavior platform, “My Heart. My Life.”, will both play a vital role in achieving the 2020 Impact Goal. AHA also strives to promote healthy habits in American children and preadolescents through the American Heart Association Teaching Gardens program. Join the movement for a heart disease-free America. In recognition of American Heart Month, please join us in donating to the American Heart Association.

Your Friends,

At 100, Reagan’s Pro-Life Legacy Takes the Cake

While the nation reminisces about Ronald Reagan’s 100th birthday, it’s interesting to see what most of the tributes leave out: Reagan the pro-lifer. In 1987, while Reagan was still in the White House, Ted Koppel was the host of ABC’s Nightline TV news show and noted that if you can say anything about Ronald Reagan, Americans know what this President believes. If you took any 50 Americans on any street corner in America and asked them what he’s for, he’s against, they could tell you: He’s pro-life; he’s against the Communists. Pro-life, against the communists. No doubt then. No memory now. President Reagan spoke of the unborn in both his Inaugural addresses, and his State of the Union speeches. He supported legislation, proposed constitutional amendments, and issued Executive Orders backing up those pro-life convictions. In his budgets, he zeroed out Planned Parenthood for eight years running. He wanted no federal money for this evil enterprise. And he wrote a book–the first President to do so while in the White House–titled Abortion and the Conscience of a Nation. He condemned no one–including pro-abortion politicians. He wouldn’t dream of criticizing the members of the Supreme Court as they sat before him at a State of the Union address. But he sent his representatives up the steps of that eminent tribunal with a call to correct the infamous Roe v. Wade ruling. On this Ronald Reagan birthday weekend, let’s remember the greatest pro-life president and thank God that he was born. – Family Research Council, Advancing Faith, Family, and Freedom 

Still Point Movie Trailer Poster - 200 pixelsRonald Reagan: Reagan 100

February 6, 2011, marks the 100th anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s birth—a celebration Young America’s Foundation is calling Reagan 100.

During Reagan 100 Young America’s Foundation will recognize President Reagan, his values, his vision, and his lasting contributions to Freedom and its future. Through the Reagan Ranch, the Reagan Ranch Center, and expanded programming all across the country, we will bring President Reagan and his ideals back to life for the next generation.

 

Reagan 100 Live Webcast

Watch Reagan 100: Freedom’s Future Weekend Live on Ustream.tv
Feb 4 Kate Obenshain
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Feb 4 Mark Larson
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Feb 4 Governor Sarah Palin
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Feb 5 Panel “Ronald Reagan’s Lasting Accomplishments
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Feb 5 Panel: “Freedom’s Future
Peter Schweizer Panelists: Brad Thor, Stephen K. Bannon, Kate Obenshain, Wynton Hall
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Feb 5 Vice President Dick Cheney
7:30 p.m. PST
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In closing- words of wisdom, that strike as true today, as when he uttered them almost 50 years ago (one of his greatest speeches).

 

1964: I am going to talk of controversial things. I make no apology for this.

  

It’s time we asked ourselves if we still know the freedoms intended for us by the Founding Fathers. James Madison said, “We base all our experiments on the capacity of mankind for self government.”

Reagan as GovernorThis idea — that government was beholden to the people, that it had no other source of power — is still the newest, most unique idea in all the long history of man’s relation to man. This is the issue of this election: Whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American Revolution and confess that a little intellectual elite in a far-distant capital can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves.

You and I are told we must choose between a left or right, but I suggest there is no such thing as a left or right. There is only an up or down. Up to man’s age-old dream–the maximum of individual freedom consistent with order — or down to the ant heap of totalitarianism. Regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would sacrifice freedom for security have embarked on this downward path. Plutarch warned, “The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.”

The Founding Fathers knew a government can’t control the economy without controlling people. And they knew when a government sets out to do that, it must use force and coercion to achieve its purpose. So we have come to a time for choosing.

Public servants say, always with the best of intentions, “What greater service we could render if only we had a little more money and a little more power.” But the truth is that outside of its legitimate function, government does nothing as well or as economically as the private sector.

Yet any time you and I question the schemes of the do-gooders, we’re denounced as being opposed to their humanitarian goals. It seems impossible to legitimately debate their solutions with the assumption that all of us share the desire to help the less fortunate. They tell us we’re always “against,” never “for” anything. 

We are for a provision that destitution should not follow unemployment by reason of old age, and to that end we have accepted Social Security as a step toward meeting the problem. However, we are against those entrusted with this program when they practice deception regarding its fiscal shortcomings, when they charge that any criticism of the program means that we want to end payments….

We are for aiding our allies by sharing our material blessings with nations which share our fundamental beliefs, but we are against doling out money government to government, creating bureaucracy, if not socialism, all over the world.

We need true tax reform that will at least make a start toward restoring for our children the American Dream that wealth is denied to no one, that each individual has the right to fly as high as his strength and ability will take him…. But we cannot have such reform while our tax policy is engineered by people who view the tax as a means of achieving changes in our social structure….

Have we the courage and the will to face up to the immorality and discrimination of the progressive tax, and demand a return to traditional proportionate taxation? . . . Today in our country the tax collector’s share is 37 cents of every dollar earned. Freedom has never been so fragile, so close to slipping from our grasp.

Are you willing to spend time studying the issues, making yourself aware, and then conveying that information to family and friends? Will you resist the temptation to get a government handout for your community? Realize that the doctor’s fight against socialized medicine is your fight. We can’t socialize the doctors without socializing the patients. Recognize that government invasion of public power is eventually an assault upon your own business. If some among you fear taking a stand because you are afraid of reprisals from customers, clients, or even government, recognize that you are just feeding the crocodile hoping he’ll eat you last.

If all of this seems like a great deal of trouble, think what’s at stake. We are faced with the most evil enemy mankind has known in his long climb from the swamp to the stars. There can be no security anywhere in the free world if there is no fiscal and economic stability within the United States. Those who ask us to trade our freedom for the soup kitchen of the welfare state are architects of a policy of accommodation.

They say the world has become too complex for simple answers. They are wrong. There are no easy answers, but there are simple answers. We must have the courage to do what we know is morally right. Winston Churchill said that “the destiny of man is not measured by material computation. When great forces are on the move in the world, we learn we are spirits–not animals.” And he said, “There is something going on in time and space, and beyond time and space, which, whether we like it or not, spells duty.”

You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we will sentence them to take the first step into a thousand years of darkness. If we fail, at least let our children and our children’s children say of us we justified our brief moment here. We did all that could be done.

 

Other links:

Reagan Foundation

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